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Alice In Wonderland Reviews (Little Angel 2010)



Alice in Wonderland

  • Michael Billington
    www. guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 4 January 2011 22.30 GMT

…a delightful piece of condensed Carroll…O'Rourke's production hits the right balance between kids' show and Kafka. Ben Glasstone's music, not least in a clarinet-backed solo for Travis's smiling cat, adds to the gaiety of a show that offers a colourful introduction to Carroll and kept my five-year-old companion quietly transfixed.




Published Monday 29 November 2010 at 11:47 by Susan Elkin

…fresh and refreshing, upbeat take on an old favourite…Ben Glasstone's songs are witty and tuneful




Alice's adventure through the rabbit hole is told with flair and humour…Ben Glasstone's score includes some catchy numbers that move the story along, musical-theatre style, as well as some very effective underscoring that does much to give this sparsely-designed production dramatic atmosphere.


Review by Sandra Giorgetti (2010)

…excellent music and lyrics by Ben Glasstone. The Cheshire Cat gets a terrific song about how mad everybody and everything is with a fabulous line about "all stations to Barking", and there is also a memorable singing Key, music to a ballet of dancing houses and the Drink Me bottle's rapping jingle



Little Angel Theatre, London, 20 November 2010 - 30 January 2011

One of the many joys of Little Angel productions is the use of original music (provided by Ben Glasstone, who also collaborated with Peter O'Rourke on the Roald Dahl adaptations). The songs include a puzzlement for Alice, a laid back bluesy number for the Caterpillar, and a show stopping music hall routine for the Cheshire Cat, all of which are wittily written and infectiously catchy.



Time Out says


By Caroline McGinn Posted: Wed Dec 1 2010

This puppet 'Alice' for the over-fives is a trippy treat. Like the swinging decade, it begins with flower power. Wooden Alice idles on a green silk riverbank then dozes off among the daisies. Flower patterns whirl, then she is swept away by the woozy, musical world of Wonderland. In the most psychedelic children's entertainment since 'The Magic Roundabout', Alice drinks jazzy green liquor then
...
This puppet 'Alice' for the over-fives is a trippy treat. Like the swinging decade, it begins with flower power. Wooden Alice idles on a green silk riverbank then dozes off among the daisies. Flower patterns whirl, then she is swept away by the woozy, musical world of Wonderland. In the most psychedelic children's entertainment since 'The Magic Roundabout', Alice drinks jazzy green liquor then loses herself in a flickering valley of the shadows, where she can't keep a grip on her burgeoning silhouette. On the way back, she meets a cat who can't stop grinning, then a hatter and a pink-eyed hare who've clearly been overdoing it on the wacky woodland tea (it's poured by a floating teapot with legs, into cups that bloom from the daisies).
Peter O'Rourke, Tim Kane and Ben Glasstone's version of Lewis Carroll's story offers plenty fun for the kids, as well as some ideas to blow their tiny minds. Glasstone's zany songs are harmonised with folksy readiness by the four puppeteers. And the Cheshire Cat, which purrs like a 'Corrie' landlady while hymning the joys of being barking mad, is a triumph of carved wooden cheek. There's also a dark, artful undercurrent. Alice is growing up and losing her identity. When she suddenly gets too big for the White Rabbit's house, the puppet ballet of houses with girls' legs protruding from them owes more to artist Louise Bourgeouis than Lewis Carroll.
Not everything is fluent. Voices wobble; so do the boards which are laboriously inserted into the stage to signify doors, foliage and the Red Queen's playing cards. A group of Victorian sepia portraits of men and girls make a fine backdrop but are rather wooden when they're lugged on to play bit-parts. Nevertheless, 'Alice' is another little wonder from the Little Angel.



Emma Bartholomew, Reporter Wednesday, 22 December, 2010 10:34 AM

I've never been a fan of Alice in Wonderland, and always found it a rather tiresome tale.
But the Little Angel puppet theatre has – as ever – worked its magic on the Lewis Carrol classic, and I've fallen in love with their trippy version.

As Alice falls asleep on the edge of a river, psychodelic spinning flowers and swinging doors sweep you away into the madness of Wonderland where houses have legs and fish fly.

The show is filled with verbal and visual nonsense, and peppered with witty catchy songs with lyrics like "Drink Me Baby yeah get it down your neck," and the chaotic "We're all mad here," which the cast of four sing in beautiful folksy harmony.


Alice in Wonderland at the Little Angel Theatre is about as innovative as theatre gets. With a cast of four, the madness of Wonderland is brought to life.

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